Get MySQL Database Size from Terminal

If you need to find out the size of MySQL databases you use from terminal, the following query will list all the databases with their respective sizes:

mysql> SELECT table_schema "database", sum(data_length + index_length)/1024/1024 "size in MB" FROM information_schema.TABLES GROUP BY table_schema;

The result you’ll get will be something like:

| database           | size in MB     |
+--------------------+----------------+
| test1              | 13542.68241349 | 
| test2              |  1522.23837675 | 
| test3              | 26532.27326164 | 
| information_schema |     0.00390626 | 
+--------------------+----------------+
4 rows in set (0.02 sec)

If you have large databases, you can show the result in gigabytes with this query:

mysql> SELECT table_schema "database", sum(data_length + index_length)/1024/1024/1024 "size in GB" FROM information_schema.TABLES GROUP BY table_schema;

If you liked the post, we should get connected - follow me on Twitter

Mass manipulation and the 5 monkeys experiment

Social control and technology to manipulate the masses, both at local and global level is a serious topic. There are numerous manipulation methods applied for decades. The fact is that with each following generation of people, those methods achieve better results. If you don’t know a lot about this topic, for beginning you can read this.

Then, take a look at one experiment:

 

Quite interesting. And now just think – did you ever wonder why you ( and people around you ) follow some matrix even you think that it’s stupid or you know a better way, did you ever follow some rules no matter they make no sense to you, … ? Who created those matrix, those rules, etc?

Are we just a group monkeys?

 


If you liked the post, we should get connected - follow me on Twitter

How to run scripts in Linux faster than Cron does

Cron is an amazing job scheduler. But, when it comes to running your scripts in less than every minute, it can’t help.

With Cron, you can run your scripts every minute, but not in shorter period of time.

This problem can be solved with simple bash script. For example, if you need to run a PHP script on every 20 seconds, you can create a bash script like this:

#!/bin/bash
#Name:myscript.sh
#Desc:Run script in every 20 seconds
while (sleep 20 && php /path_to_your_script/your_script_name.php) &
do
 wait $!
done

Then, make script executable, and add it to the system startup. That’s all.

 

 


If you liked the post, we should get connected - follow me on Twitter

Linux gets frozen, what do you do?

Somehow, you crashed your Linux. It’s completely frozen. You try pressing Ctrl + Alt + Backspace, but doesn’t help.

What to do? Someone would press the power button and restart or shut down the system. You shouldn’t do this. This can make you a lot of problems.

 

What you can do, is to perform a gentle Linux restart.  This is much safer way to restart your frozen Linux.  To do this, you need to press:

Ctrl + Alt + PrtSc (SysRq) + reisub

Just to make it clear. You need to press and hold Ctrl, Alt and PrtSc(SysRq) buttons, and while holding them, you need to press r, e, i, s, u, b

This will restart your Linux safely.

It’s possible that you’ll have problem to reach all the buttons you need to press. I’ve seen people type reisub with their nose :)

So, here’s my suggestion: With your smallest finger on the left hand, press Ctrl. With your thumb on left hand, press Alt. With the smallest finger on your right hand press PrtSc(SysRq) button. This way, you’ll be able to access to reisub buttons with your other fingers.

Okay, but what this REISUB means? 

  • R: Switch the keyboard from raw mode to XLATE mode
  • E: Send the SIGTERM signal to all processes except init
  • I: Send the SIGKILL signal to all processes except init
  • S: Sync all mounted filesystems
  • U: Remount all mounted filesystems in read-only mode
  • B: Immediately reboot the system, without unmounting partitions or syncing

You can find the complete list here. There you can see that shuts down the system. So, if you want to turn off your PC when your Linux crash, you can use this combination:

Ctrl + Alt + PrtSc (SysRq) + reisuo


If you liked the post, we should get connected - follow me on Twitter

The Success of Introverts vs. Extroverts

New research from Adam Grant, the youngest tenured professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Management, is really intriguing. In his study, Grant collected data from sales representatives at a software company. He began by giving reps an often-used personality assessment that measures introversion and extroversion on a 1-to-7 scale, with 1 being most introverted and 7 being most extroverted.

 

Then he tracked their performance over the next three months.
The introverts fared worst; they earned average revenue of $120 per hour.
The extroverts performed slightly better, pulling in $125 per hour. But neither did nearly as well as a third group: the ambiverts.
In Grant’s study, ambiverts earned average hourly revenues of $155, beating extroverts by a healthy 24 percent.

Who are Ambiverts?

Ambiverts, a term coined by social scientists in the 1920s, are people who are neither extremely introverted nor extremely extroverted. Think back to that 1-to-7 scale that Grant used. Ambiverts aren’t 1s or 2s, but they’re not 6s or 7s either. They’re 3s, 4s and 5s. They’re not quiet, but they’re not loud. They know how to assert themselves, but they’re not pushy.

via washingtonpost.com


If you liked the post, we should get connected - follow me on Twitter